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6 Tips for Palletizing Cargo

Good packaging is key to keeping cargo intact throughout its shipping journey. Using a pallet is one of the best ways to ensure your cargo arrives safely and securely at its destination. Pallets are stable transport plates made from wood, plastic or metal that are core components of modern logistical processes. Palletizing your cargo keeps it protected throughout loading, transport and unloading—and makes the entire process faster and more efficient. Pallets also make it easier to move everything from small packages to large bulky items with machinery like a forklift or pallet jack.

It’s essential to carefully prepare pallets and packages for shipping. Read on for tips on properly palletizing your freight.

1. Use Quality Materials

Using quality packaging materials can prevent shipping disasters. Start with good quality boxes that are the right size for your cargo. Get quality packing materials as well—you’ll need sturdy shrink wrap, corrugated cardboard inserts to fill voids in boxes, and either bubble wrap, Styrofoam peanuts or air pillows to cushion package contents. Be sure to seal all packages with quality packing tape.

2. Choose the Right Size

Look for a pallet that is big enough to hold your cargo without hanging over and sturdy enough to support its weight. Avoid pallets with broken boards or protruding nail heads.

3. Properly Pack Each Box

Make sure each individual box is packed well before loading it onto a pallet. Boxes should be full, with no air spaces and an even distribution of weight. The box’s contents can get crushed and damaged if there is air space and shifting can occur if weight is distributed unevenly. Use your choice of packing material, such as Styrofoam peanuts or air pillows, to fill any voids. Seal with plenty of high-quality packing tape.

4. Stack Carefully

Stack boxes together on the pallet, with weight distributed as evenly as possible. Heavier boxes should go at the bottom, with lighter ones at the top. Stagger or align the boxes to boost stability. Stacking the packages incorrectly or failing to secure them to the pallet can result in injury to the handlers or damage to the cargo.

5. Stabilize With Cardboard

Add layers of flattened cardboard to every few rows of boxes and to the top and bottom to improve stability and weight distribution. Add cardboard corner beads to protect against damage to the corner edges. This strengthens the entire pallet and helps solidify any loose boxes. It’s especially helpful when shipping several small packages rather than just a few larger ones.

6. Go Big With Shrink Wrap

Use high-quality shrink wrap to secure everything on the pallet. Wrap the pallet three to five times to keep packages from coming loose. Twist the wrap to strengthen it as you secure the boxes. Start at the bottom and work your way up, but only wrap the top partially. This ensures that your cargo won’t separate from the pallet while keeping it accessible to forklifts. Further secure your packages by strapping the load to the pallet.

Follow these tips to help ensure the safe arrival of your precious cargo. Click here to learn more about the best cargo transport company in Los Angeles and the surrounding areas.

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The Impact of Longer Detention Times

A recent study by the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) found that truckers are waiting longer at customer docks than in previous years. The wait times associated with both pickup and delivery, known as “detention,” rose significantly since 2014, when more than 1,900 fleets and 1,600 drivers from various freight companies were originally polled. Drivers reported a 27.4% increase in delays of six hours or more when they were surveyed again in 2018.

This research conducted by the ATRI, which is the independent research arm of the American Trucking Associations, brings awareness to the full financial impact associated with detention times. As truckers spend longer time periods waiting at loading docks, this cuts into revenue and gross profits for freight companies and drivers, and ultimately, increases consumer costs. According to a 2018 report by the Department of Transportation, wait times are estimated to cost trucking companies and drivers over $1 billion per year in revenues lost.

Delays also increase the pressure on drivers, who typically get paid by the mile, to hustle to pick up their next load. While some companies charge hourly detention rates, the length of time drivers wait before the fees begin can vary depending on the contract. As a result, drivers may speed or drive while tired to make up for lost time. This raises the risk of accidents and impacts drivers’ overall health.

Truckers report that it’s common to see 20 to 30 trucks waiting to unload and that detention lasts anywhere from two to eight hours. The 2018 survey found that 40% more drivers reported that the majority of delays were due to customer actions. They cited strained shipping operations and delays at store loading docks or outside distribution center gates. Drivers and carriers noted that well-organized customers who utilized technology, maintained tight schedules and took advantage of flexible business hours were able to reduce delays.

While 2018 was characterized by longer wait times, it was also one of the busiest years for freight companies. The American Trucking Associations reported that trucks moved 11.49 billion tons of freight across the country, a 15.3% increase from 2014. Hopefully, this research will help the industry devise better driver detention strategies for both carriers and drivers, and provide insight to educate customers on better loading and unloading practices.

Click through to learn more about what sets Best Yet Express apart from other freight companies.

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Driver Shortage vs Capacity Storage

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Strengthen Your Brand with A Competent Last Mile Delivery Service

For businesses in the on-demand and retail industry, the last and most critical step in their supply chain is the one with the most problems. This last step, universally known as last-mile delivery, involves the movement of products from their respective distribution centers to the final destination (end users). Although last mile delivery is at the tail end of the supply chain, it plays a decisive and crucial role in how customers view a business. In most cases, it is the benchmark used to evaluate the efficiency of a business’ supply chain. Read more

Top Ways Of Recruiting The Ideal Truck Driver

If you work in the trucking industry you know that a major obstacle, if not the most difficult obstacle today, is driver recruiting and the obvious driver shortage. They say that the shortage is, in part, due to the large number of truck drivers retiring from the industry as well as a smaller number of individuals from the new generation who are willing to take on the truck driving profession. The slow increase in driver pay over recent decades and the physical demand play major roles in less drivers entering the market. Read more

Ways to Optimize Cargo Scheduling for Local Shipping Services

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Although logistics companies desire this, market forces currently plaguing the industry such as ever-increasing fuel and labor costs, as well as the shortage of truck drivers, are making logistics operations more complex, and less profitable than ever before. Read more

Security shouldn’t be a roadblock for Mexico shipments

The signing of NAFTA (the North American Fair Trade Agreement) in the 90’s and the rapid growth of a competitive manufacturing market in Mexico resulted in an increase in the number of cross-border business between the U.S. and Mexico. Estimates from the Office of the United States Trade Representative value this trade at $580 billion annually with cross-border truck trades accounting for nearly $6.6 billion in industry revenues. Read more