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What would happen if truck drivers went on strike

What Would Happen If Truck Drivers Went on Strike?

Running a trucking company is rewarding, but challenging.  If the entire BYX team decided to call it quits and sell ice cream on the beach in the Bahamas, however, our customers would be less than thrilled. Just one trucking company hitting the breaks would be enough to slow down the daily operations of dozens of businesses. Imagine if truck drivers went on strike nationwide. 

Life as we know it would grind to a halt. To appreciate how important the logistics industry is to our economy, let’s look at the timeline. 

If truck drivers went on strike, problems would start within 24 hours 

Day One

Once truck drivers quit, it wouldn’t take long to start noticing the effects. Within one day, gas shortages would start. The most popular fuel stations need gas deliveries multiple times a day. They’d run out in just a few hours, leading to traffic-stopping lines at any station still stocked. 

Hospitals, nursing homes, and any other facilities that rely on medical supplies to function would be in immediate trouble. Although they’ve likely prepared for emergencies, they would still have to resort to extreme measures to conserve their remaining supplies. Syringes, catheters, and other products needed to save lives would be reserved for those in critical care. 

The manufacturing industry would also fly into a panic. Many manufacturers, like those in the tech industry, produce goods at the last minute to avoid making more than they can sell. Without any reserves to fall back on, they wouldn’t be able to continue production for long.  Read more

An Inside Look at the BYX Family

As you probably already know, Best Yet Express is a family-owned business. It’s led by Jay Newjahr, Owner and CEO, the son of founders Chris and Sherry Newjahr, and his wife, Lara Press-Newjahr, who serves as President. The husband-wife team has learned a lot along the way. In celebration of another successful year serving So-Cal, BYX sat down with Lara and Jay to get a closer look at what it’s really like behind the scenes. 

 

How has doing business changed since BYX was founded? 

Originally, much of the business consisted of one-off shipments. Companies with occasional shipments would hire us here and there, but they lacked the volume to offer steady business. This meant we were constantly chasing down the next lead, creating instability. 

We still have some of those customers, but the focus of the business shifted to building partnerships with other businesses that rely on us to keep their operations going. We think of ourselves as an extension of these businesses that need us to perform to operate themselves. 

Technology has also changed the business a lot. We’ve come a long way from two-way radios and handwritten post-it notes hanging on a pegboard. Everything is done online now and that has drastically changed efficiency. The company started with a pickup truck and a strict focus on trucking. Today, we’ve also expanded into the warehouse and brokerage space.

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Things to be grateful for

7 Things to Be Grateful for This Holiday Season

The holidays are one of the busiest seasons for business owners and logistics professionals alike. It can be stressful, but there’s also a lot to celebrate. If this year’s holiday rush is stressing you out, take a breather and think about these seven amazing reasons to be grateful this year. 

1. Christmas shopping can be done from your couch. Who wouldn’t be grateful about that?

We’ve gotten so used to this one that we almost forgot how holiday shopping used to work. Black Friday was exclusively an in-person ordeal. Shoppers had to get up at the crack of dawn to camp out in front of Best Buy. There was a literal stampede at Walmart. If you wanted to get the best deals, you had to power through a day standing in line at the mall. Now, you can get the same deals while catching up on Netflix’s latest Christmas specials and snacking on leftover pie. Read more

BYX fleet

5 Things Every BYX Customer Should Know

A lot has changed since BYX was founded over 40 years ago. As times and technology have changed, we’ve changed too. In 2022, we went the extra mile to make sure we live up to our motto: Our goal is to make the lives of our clients easier, one steady shipment at a time. We update our technology and improve our training practices on an ongoing basis to continue offering our customers the best, least stressful logistics services in all of Southern California. 

For a quick recap, here’s what’s new at the end of 2022

More space, more warehousing options

  1. We have a new warehouse
    Our 100,000 sq. ft. racked warehouse facility boasts 32 ft clearance, 23 dock doors, state-of-the-art security cameras, and the latest tech to keep your valuables organized and safe
  2. We’ve updated our fleet
    With over 75 trailers and 45 power units, all with the latest tracking and safety tech, we can service more shipments in less time
  3. We’re offering more storage solutions than ever
    With all that additional space, BYX can now manage both warehousing and shipping needs all under one roof. Streamlined services simplify logistics for our clients, in addition to offering a more flexible and efficient shipping experience
  4. We offer cross docking, transloading, and devanning services
    The entire mission of BYX is to offer the most comprehensive logistics solutions possible. Our job is to make yours easier. In addition to offering fast, competitively priced shipping, we aim to streamline our customers’ supply chains and help their businesses succeed. Less turnover time and lower handling and storage costs are just a few of the perks.
  5. Our team has gone up a size
    With over 65 employees, including some key new managers, we have plenty of hands on deck to ensure reliable service around the clock.

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Jobs in the trucking industry

14 Jobs in the Trucking Industry Other Than Driving

When most people think of jobs in the trucking industry, truck driving is the only one that comes to mind. There are over a dozen other jobs in logistics, however, that do not require a commercial driver’s license. Many of them don’t require applicants to step behind the wheel at all! If you’re curious about career options, keep reading for an overview of some of the most common trucking industry jobs below. 

Note: The salary ranges are sourced from Indeed.com based on national averages. It’s safe to assume they’re higher in areas where the cost of living is higher, like right here in Los Angeles. The most lucrative ones are saved for last! Read more

New Smog Check Requirements for Trucks May Help LA’s Air Quality

No one gets excited about getting a smog check, but there’s one thing all Los Angeles residents can look forward to: Fewer days in which our local mountains disappear in a cloud of brown haze. Numerous factors contribute to pollution in southern California, including smoke from wildfires and chemicals produced by refineries and other factories. The main cause of air pollution in LA County, however, comes from the emissions produced by the vehicles backed up on the 405. 

The air quality in LA has improved dramatically in the past 30 years, but cars and trucks are still responsible for over 50% of all emissions. In hopes of further reducing the number of days that our Google Home devices tell us that the air quality is too unhealthy for a walk on the beach, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) is cracking down on trucks.  Read more

Drive safely

How to Drive Safely Around Trucks (Or in One)

We all think we drive safely, but do we really? August 16, 2022 started out like any other day. 71-year-old Larry Lee Atham, President of a West Virginia-based trucking company, got behind the wheel for a routine day of driving. At mile marker 132 on the I-79, everything changed. He lost control of the truck, hitting a guardrail, skidding across traffic, hitting the guardrail again, and catching fire. That was his last drive. Just a day later on a winding mountain highway in Buffalo, Wyoming, another driver, Texas-based Javier Cardoso-Reyes, couldn’t slow down, rolled over a guardrail and down an embankment, and never made it home. He was only 47. 

29 truck drivers lined up their vehicles to pay their respects after Atham’s memorial service, rolling slowly past the funeral home to say goodbye. As touching as their gesture was, the loss of Atham, and just a day later, Cardoso-Reyes, in single-vehicle trucking accidents, raises serious concerns. Just one driver lost is one too many. Are we doing enough to prevent casualties?  Read more

Trucker protesting AB 5 law

Big News: The Controversial AB 5 Law Now Applies to Trucking

Back in 2019, a bill was proposed called the AB 5 independent contractor law. It was intended to regulate companies that hire massive numbers of gig workers, like Uber and DoorDash, but when the law went into effect on January 1, 2020, it radically changed worker classifications.

Millions who were previously defined as independent contractors are now considered employees. While the trucking industry was previously exempt from AB 5, the Supreme Court’s recent ruling changes everything. Now, the law applies to trucking too, sparking industry-wide frustration. 

No Buts About It: The AB 5 Law Is Bad for Trucking (But not BYX)

Now that AB 5 impacts all 1099 truck drivers, the majority of trucking companies will be impacted. 

The law states that to be classified as an independent contractor, three conditions must be met: 

(a) The worker is free from control and direction in the performance of services; and

(b) The worker is performing work outside the usual course of the business of the hiring company; and

(c) The worker is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, or business. Read more

labor shortage

In 2022, Small Businesses Are Still Facing a Labor Shortage. Here’s Why.

COVID-19 hit the U.S. at full force in March of 2020. Small businesses were among the hardest hit. Many were forced to close their doors permanently. As a company with decades of experience and stability, BYX was able to weather the storm. Sadly, the full ramifications of the pandemic are still unfolding. Even now, we’re struggling to find qualified, reliable workers, and we’re not the only ones. Businesses around the country are facing a frustrating labor shortage, and there appears to be no end in sight. What gives? Read more

Truck driver with sleep apnea yawning

3 Reasons Sleep Apnea Is a Concern for Truck Drivers

It’s late. You’re driving on an open stretch of road, it’s quiet, and your eyelids begin to droop. We’ve all been there, and man, isn’t it scary? Driving is such an ordinary task that it’s easy to forget how dangerous it is. A moment of distraction can easily become your last moment ever. Sleepiness is even more dangerous, and truck drivers who work long hours or night shifts need to be especially cautious. Concerningly, getting enough sleep isn’t always enough to fight back fatigue. Sleep apnea, one of the top five most common sleep disorders, can lead to persistent fatigue and drowsiness. Many drivers don’t even realize they have it. 

Sleep apnea is a bigger health concern than you might think.

Truck driver sleeping

Truck driver sleeping. About 35 years old, African male.

The most obvious symptom of sleep apnea is snoring. The disorder is more complex than that, however. In people with obstructive sleep apnea, the muscles in the throat relax during sleep to the point that their airway temporarily becomes blocked. They stop breathing briefly before awakening abruptly to gasp for air. These episodes are so brief that the individual often doesn’t recall having ever woken up. 

While one night of interrupted sleep is no big deal, people with untreated sleep apnea suffer from a wide range of symptoms that can significantly affect their health and daily lives. There are three main reasons truck drivers should be on the lookout for signs of sleep apnea: 

  1. It leads to more serious health problems.
    At first people with sleep apnea may notice nothing more than waking up with a headache, irritability, and snoring loud enough to wake the neighbors. Over time, the symptoms become more serious. They often develop brain fog, insomnia, and intense daytime sleepiness.

    If left untreated, it can also lead to or worsen high blood pressure, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. Weight gain is another common side effect. All of these issues are often linked, each one magnifying the others. The ramifications go beyond productivity, impacting drivers on every level.
  2. It endangers drivers and others on the road.
    Daytime sleepiness and general fatigue are extremely dangerous when your job entails long hours on the road. Those with sleep apnea are up to five times more likely to get in a car accident than people with normal sleep patterns. Falling asleep at the wheel can be lethal not only to the driver but to other drivers and passengers as well– Especially when the driver is operating a massive truck.
  3. Irregular sleep schedules can make sleep apnea side effects worse.
    Sleep apnea is problematic enough for people working a 9-5. It’s even worse for truck drivers who work night shifts. Odd hours don’t worsen sleep apnea itself, working during the night often leads to increased drowsiness. Drivers are more likely to rely on unhealthy energy drinks to stay alert, further damaging their health in the process. 

All truck drivers should be screened, just in case.

If we’re making sleep apnea sound like a big deal, that’s because it is. Fortunately, treating it is much less challenging than living with it. If you or someone you know is experiencing any symptoms that could be tied to sleep issues, like persistent sleepiness, morning headaches, irritability, or loud snoring, visiting your PCP is the first step. 

They’ll likely order a sleep study to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment can entail using a breathing machine at night or wearing a special night guard to help keep your airways open. It’s a headache, but it’s much less of a headache than falling asleep at the wheel. For trucking companies like BYX, it’s always a good idea to inform drivers about the common signs and symptoms of sleep apnea. Better safe than sorry.